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20121128
20121206
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folks including small business owners, middle class americans and mitt romney-loving ceos. if awkward meetings are par for the course in washington, the president's one today takes the cake. later this hour, president obama will sit down for a post-election chitchat with the prince of awkward, the king of tilted conversation and uncomfortabled one-liners, mitt romney. is there a role for mittens in obama world? >> the president noted that governor romney did a terrific job running the olympics and that skill set lends itself to ideas that could make the federal government work better which is a passion of the president's which he's requested reorganization authority from the congress do just that. >> translation, mitt romney may oversee the installation of a new color coded filing system in the white house. thanks for play, governor. and anyway, charm offenses aside the president knows that his real audience is with the american people. according to most recent "the washington post"/abc news poll 60% support his position on taxes while only 37% oppose it. and when you're up 23 points
is underscoring his reasonableness. i feel like this is a reasonableness towards having romney to the white house, meeting with ceos who donated to romney going out there as michael crowley pointed out, we were chit chatting over the president, full disclosure, the president using a fair and balanced to describe his approach which is a republican line. >> never heard the phrase. >> but, you know, the question is, does that at some point backfire for him? the republicans seem to be pushing back saying this is extreme, insane, we can't believe this is -- >> i think the best contrast for what's happening is the stimulus bill that happened in 2009. it was the first thing he did after being elected in 2008 and did a dramatically different than what he did now. he structured the bill with the tax cuts in it and told republicans okay, come on board, you have about a third of the tax cuts in the package, that's what you wanted and he didn't give them an incentive to buy into the enterprise. he didn't allow them to claim ownership of the change to the legislation and did an inside game what melissa was ta
, presidential candidate mitt romney didn't want to tell the american people how he was going to do his tax reform. because it certainly is not possible to get to the revenue number that the president's called for, $1.6 trillion, be without raising the rates and i would point out that the bipartisan simpson-bowles commission assumes in their numbers that those rates will go up. so when they did tax reform, they did it from a starting point that assumed the revenue from those rates going up and the last point on the revenue i would make, alex, the total amount of revenue called for in the bipartisan simpson-bowles commission report, is more revenue than the president's calling for at $1.6 trillion. and the president's $1.6 trillion is less than the $5 trillion that would come in over the next ten years if we go over the cliff. >> josh, i want to open this up to our panel in new york for a second. are we to believe then, as the representative van hollen says, that the numbers just weren't crutched appropriately in 2011 or -- i just think that is the most marked example of how dramatically thi
're just going to throw out the deduction and not specify it, that would be the only legacy of mitt romney that we're talking about right now. we all joked about how he was totally uninfluential in this party. this has stuck. didn't work for romney. people were not interested in that. i don't really see what interest the white house has in making a deal. so far all the public polling makes it look like, again, this could change, but all the public polling makes it look if we go over the cliff the republicans will be blamed and they're the ones being recalcitrant and the white house can make a deal on their terms because they won. >> in terms of who's going to get blamed if we go over the cliff, ari, is there a risk as the republicans put forth a plan f you're john public, does that seem like a reasonable offer? i don't know. they're playing ball. do the democrats risk getting blamed if we go over the fiscal cliff now that there is a counter offer from the gop? >> that's the interesting question. connects with what ezra was talking about. do the actual sacrifices happen in your backyard and
. governor romney suggested that during the campaign. >> senator, pain is not something we like to talk about in american politics under any circumstances. are you confident -- i mean there has been some talk democrats do not want to put entitlement reform on the table at all ever. but you seem to think this is a real -- this will happen? >> alex, and, in fact, on the super committee the democrats put forward serious proposals on entitlement reform. we have stated very clearly, that you don't have to cut benefits to do it. that will impact people directly. i mean charging people more for their medicare is not part of the solution that we believe. privatizing it as ryan has suggested it. but we put serious, you know, considerable dollars on the table. that was rejected by the republicans for one reason. they didn't want to match it with revenue. and that's why the debate we're having right now, about extending the bush tax cuts for 98% of the americans, the middle class, is the right thing to do. letting the wealthiest tax cuts, the tax cuts go back to the clinton era, will provide the revenue
ryan -- with the ryan/romney ads were downright hypocritical and the president has greater political strength coming out of this and he's got his own plan and he's been specific on his own terms and i think when geithner sits around uttering the same talking point over and over again about tell us what you're talking about, i think it's a fair thing to do. i think the president has a political strength right now to force the republicans to offer their own very unpopular -- >> we'll see. that's what's going to get played out over the next few weeks. >> it's chicken. >> he has more leverage. doesn't have all the leverage. >> he sass some. >> he's coming out strong. >> what leverage do the republicans -- i mean yes, they have some. >> they control the house. >> yes. >> that is the fact. >> but -- the reason that john boehner doesn't have very much leverage in these discussions is he doesn't really control his own caucus. >> that's true. >> and he's not a terribly reliable negotiating partner. >> john boehner does have within his caucus a certain number of votes in his pocket that will w
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6